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The epic western Django Unchained is one of writer/director Quentin Tarantino’s biggest hits, and a crossover sequel was in development, but that was recently announced Django/Zorro was potted. The sequel was even more ambitious than its predecessor, saw two iconic movie characters teaming up and had the potential to be an event movie like no other.

However, after years of development, the studio finally concluded that this would have been impossible. But what has been revealed about the film makes its cancellation a much harder pill to swallow, even if Sony was right.

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It’s based on a comic book


The idea for the crossover film isn’t new and actually came to fruition not long after the release of the first film, but in a very different form of media. Many films were followed by a comic series, and django is no different, as Tarantino collaborated with comics creator Matt Wagner to bring the idea to life in the panels of a 2014 graphic novel.

Wagner had written Zorro comics in the past, so already knew the character well, but because of the content Django/Zorro gave the writer more freedom than ever. The comic book is full of exciting western tropes, but they’re steeped in typical Tarantino violence.


The premise of the film


The death scene of Dr.  Schultz in Django Unchained

The sequel should be a lot more ambitious than the original 2012 film. That hardly seems possible since the film takes place in a wide range of weather conditions, entire western towns have been built and the film ends with an entire plantation being blown up. That’s not surprising Django Unchained is Tarantino’s most expensive film with a budget of 100 million dollars.

The sequel, unsurprisingly, would have had the same themes and tone centered around slavery, just on a much larger scale. Corresponding geek outpost, the movie would have followed Django as he became Don Diego de la Vegas’ bodyguard. Vega is also Zorro, and the two would have worked together to free the local aboriginal population from slavery.


Tarantino suggested it to Antonio Banderas


It seems like Tarantino’s iteration of Zorro wasn’t his own or any sort of reboot, but it would have served as a sequel to the Antonio Banderas-led series just as much as it would have been django Consequence. Banderas starred in two films as Vega in the 1990s and 2000s, The Mask of Zoro and The Legend of Zoro.

Tarantino reportedly reached out to Banderas about potentially reprising his role as the masked vigilante, and the answer was a resounding yes. The actor explained that after Tarantino pitched the idea to him on Oscars night in 2020, he was all in and thought, “It would be amazing and fun and crazy.”


A comedian was hired to co-write the screenplay


Jamie Foxx as Django in Django Unchained

Tarantino has always written and directed his films himself, and there was very little contribution to his material from outside sources. But in an unprecedented turn of events, the beloved filmmaker found a writing partner to direct Django/Zorro.

Tarantino hired comedian Jerrod Carmichael to co-write the screenplay, which is surprising since the comedian doesn’t have author rights to his name outside of stand-up specials and documentaries. However, the sequel could have been a lot more comedy than the original film, and given Carmichael’s appearances in films like mid 90s and The Disaster Artisthe would have a good flair for comedy-drama.


Jamie Foxx wanted back


Jamie Foxx at the end of Django Unchained

django is the most rerun Tarantino film, and that’s thanks in part to Jamie Foxx’s effortless cool and charisma. And seeing that again is one of many reasons why a django A sequel would have been great. It turns out Banderas wasn’t the only actor willing to reprise an iconic role, as it seems Jamie Foxx wanted the project to take off just as much as anyone else.

Foxx has expressed an interest in returning to the Wild West, and it’s little wonder he’d jump at the chance to play Django again. The film is Foxx’s highest-grossing film in a leading role, and the film reveals that he had so much fun playing the vengeful torch-wielding bounty hunter.

It would have cost $500 million to make


Django and King Shultz walk down the sidewalk.

Tarantino has many unrealized projects, but the fact that Django/Zorro will never see the light of day is the most disappointing. However, the reason the studio dropped it is understandable, to say the least. Corresponding GQ, the reason the film was ultimately canned by the studio was how much it would have cost to produce. But it’s hard to believe the film would cost that much to make, and it’s impossible to imagine what huge set pieces could possibly bring the film to such a massive budget.

No film in the world has ever cost $500 million, not even any avatar or Marvel Cinematic Universe film. And that number doesn’t even take into account the marketing budget, so the film would have had to gross at least over a billion dollars at the box office to break even. That’s a big gamble considering the original film grossed $425 million.

It’s not the only Django Unchained sequel Tarantino had in mind


Sam Jackson with two guns in The Hateful Eight.

So many of Tarantino’s films lend themselves to potentially huge franchises, be it the criminal underbelly pulp fiction or kill Bill, a threesome of which is still in development. but Django Unchained surprisingly has the best chance of becoming a cinematic universe in its own right.

Django/Zorro wasn’t the film’s only sequel in development, but it’s loud game rantTarantinos The Hateful Eight was originally a django follow too. Under this name, the filmmaker began to write the screenplay Django in the White Hell, and it was identical to the final version of the film, with only Major Warren replacing the iconic gunslinger. In an alternate timeline, viewers would have been treated to two Django sequels by now.


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